1. Tetzlaff Plays Bach: By the Numbers When you attend an artistic performance, the audience rarely knows the nitty gritty details of all that went into presenting it. For 92Y Concerts’ opening night on September 18, we are breaking down Christian Tetzlaff’s solo performance by the numbers. The German violinist will be performing Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas in full—a marathon achievement. Here’s how the evening stacks up! 2412 bars of music (without repeats).2400 seconds of intermission.1800 eyes on stage.900 glasses of champagne served at intermission.380 calories burned (approx.) by Tetzlaff.212 years since the Sonatas and Partitas were published.130 minutes on stage to perform.64 variations in the famous Chaconne.28 movements.17 years for Bach to compose.12 years old—the age when Tetzlaff first started learning the pieces.6 works.1 violinist.
You’ve seen the numbers, now hear the music on September 18!

    Tetzlaff Plays Bach: By the Numbers

    When you attend an artistic performance, the audience rarely knows the nitty gritty details of all that went into presenting it. For 92Y Concerts’ opening night on September 18, we are breaking down Christian Tetzlaff’s solo performance by the numbers. The German violinist will be performing Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas in full—a marathon achievement. Here’s how the evening stacks up!

    2412 bars of music (without repeats).
    2400 seconds of intermission.
    1800 eyes on stage.
    900 glasses of champagne served at intermission.
    380 calories burned (approx.) by Tetzlaff.
    212 years since the Sonatas and Partitas were published.
    130 minutes on stage to perform.
    64 variations in the famous Chaconne.
    28 movements.
    17 years for Bach to compose.
    12 years old—the age when Tetzlaff first started learning the pieces.
    6 works.
    1 violinist.

    You’ve seen the numbers, now hear the music on September 18!

  2. Jazz in July’s first group of artists outside 92Y in 1985. Photo by Steve J. Sherman4 Facts You Didn’t Know About the Maestros of Jazz in July
Our six-concert Jazz in July music festival kicks off on July 22, featuring the music of Hoagy Charmichael, Leonard Bernstein, Miles Davis and the songs that kept Fred Astaire dancing. While the concert series readies to debut its 30th season, the New York Times profiled Jazz in July’s original artistic director Dick Hyman (who created it in 1985) and his successor Bill Charlap. Below are four facts you may not have known about these jazz lovers.
Prior to his creation of Jazz in July, Hyman worked with filmmaker Woody Allen and choreographer Twyla Tharp.
Hyman and Charlap are distant cousins.
Charlap’s father, Mark “Moose” Charlap, is the composer of the Broadway musical Peter Pan.
Charlap is an accomplished artist on Blue Note Records.
Learn more about Jazz in July in the Times. Then get your secure your seats and experience the “hot jazz” for yourself!

    Jazz in July’s first group of artists outside 92Y in 1985. Photo by Steve J. Sherman

    4 Facts You Didn’t Know About the Maestros of Jazz in July

    Our six-concert Jazz in July music festival kicks off on July 22, featuring the music of Hoagy Charmichael, Leonard Bernstein, Miles Davis and the songs that kept Fred Astaire dancing. While the concert series readies to debut its 30th season, the New York Times profiled Jazz in July’s original artistic director Dick Hyman (who created it in 1985) and his successor Bill Charlap. Below are four facts you may not have known about these jazz lovers.

    • Prior to his creation of Jazz in July, Hyman worked with filmmaker Woody Allen and choreographer Twyla Tharp.
    • Hyman and Charlap are distant cousins.
    • Charlap’s father, Mark “Moose” Charlap, is the composer of the Broadway musical Peter Pan.
    • Charlap is an accomplished artist on Blue Note Records.

    Learn more about Jazz in July in the Times. Then get your secure your seats and experience the “hot jazz” for yourself!

  3. Ryan Shaw sings “Evermore” from his 2012 album Real Love

    We’re pleased to present Ryan Shaw, a recent addition to the cast of tonight’s sold-out 80th Birthday Celebration of Songwriter Mike Stoller and his partnership with lyricist Jerry Leiber, which produced such iconic songs like “Jailhouse Rock,” On Broadway, “Love Potion #9” and “Is That All There Is?”

    This weekend Ryan just received his third Grammy nomination, Best Traditional R&B Performance for “Yesterday” in his new CD, Real Love, as well as a collective nomination for Best Cast Album for Motown: The Musical. To introduce Ryan, we asked him our “Stoller Q&A.”

    What’s your favorite Leiber and Stoller song?
    “I Who Have Nothing.” It was my first audition song in New York. It was my second day in New York City on my own, and I had an audition for Smokey Joe’s Cafe. I did my best to recreate Victor Cook’s rendition—and I received a standing ovation from the panel. But the problem came in the dance callback…yikes!

    What other artists would you like to perform with whom you haven’t yet?
    I would love to perform with Aretha Franklin and Stevie Wonder (who I now play on Broadway in Motown: The Musical).

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  4. Bettye LaVette’s standout performance: “Love Reign O’er Me” at the 2008 Kennedy Center Honors

    We’re honored to welcome Bettye LaVette to the guest roster of our 80th Birthday Celebration of Songwriter Mike Stoller, now numbering more than two dozen artists. Mike Stoller and his lyricist partner Jerry Leiber made one of the greatest songwriting teams of all times.

    Enjoy Bettye’s responses to our “Stoller Q&A.”

    What’s your favorite Leiber and Stoller song?
    There are too many to name just one.

    What artists would you like to perform with whom you haven’t yet?
    I’d enjoy singing with Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard or Bobby Womack.

    What is your favorite “guilty pleasure” song?
    “Travelin’ Man” by Ricky Nelson, but I don’t feel guilty about it.

    Read More

  5. Sally Kellerman sings “La Vie en Rose” in a duet with Bertie Higgins. The song was originally sung by Edith Piaf; Leiber & Stoller wrote their “L’Homme à la Moto” for Piaf.

    The great Sally Kellerman joins us for our 80th Birthday Celebration of Songwriter Mike Stoller hosted by Paul Shaffer. Mike Stoller and lyricist Jerry Leiber bridged the gap between R&B and rock ‘n’ roll through songs like “Hound Dog,” “There Goes My Baby” and “Stand By Me.” We asked Sally a few questions to get ready for the big night.

    What are your favorite Leiber and Stoller songs?
    “Is That All There Is?,” “Kansas City,” “I’m a Woman,” “On Broadway” and “Love Potion No. 9”

    What other artists would you like to perform with whom you haven’t yet?
    Rod Stewart, Kenny Loggins, Joe Cocker, Leon Russell, Michael McDonald, Sting, Smokey Robinson, Van Morrison and Barry Manilow

    Read More

  6. Video: A classic 60s clip from The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. Corky Hale accompanies Tony Bennett, chats with Johnny, gives Johnny a harp lesson then sings her own number with the band.

    We’re thrilled to have Corky Hale as part of our 80th Birthday Celebration of Songwriter Mike Stoller hosted by Paul Shaffer. If you’re unfamiliar with the name Mike Stoller, you know his songs: “Hound Dog,” “Jailhouse Rock,” “Love Potion #9,” “Is That All There Is?,” “There Goes My Baby” to name a few. Together with lyricist Jerry Leiber, he bridged the gap between segregated R&B dance music and mainstream rock ‘n’ roll.

    We asked Corky a few questions to get ready for the big night.

    What are your favorite Leiber and Stoller songs?
    One that I will be performing on December 9: “Loving You” and one that people have yet to hear, from the new Oscar Wilde musical that Mike is working on, called “My Darling Oscar.”

    What other artists would you like to perform with whom you haven’t yet?
    Brian Stokes Mitchell

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  7. Video: Dee Dee Bridgewater with Ray Charles: “Precious Thing”

    We’re thrilled to have Dee Dee Bridgewater as part of our 80th Birthday Celebration of Songwriter Mike Stoller hosted by Paul Shaffer. If you’re unfamiliar with the name Mike Stoller, you know his songs: “Hound Dog,” “Jailhouse Rock,” “Love Potion #9,” “Is That All There Is?,” “There Goes My Baby” to name a few. Together with lyricist Jerry Leiber, he bridged the gap between segregated R&B dance music and mainstream rock ‘n’ roll.

    We asked Dee Dee a few questions to get ready for the big night.

    What are your favorite Leiber and Stoller songs?
    “I’m a Woman,” “Hound Dog”

    What artists would you like to perform with whom you haven’t yet?
    Bill Withers, Prince, Susan Tedeshi & Derek Trucks

    Read More

  8. How does an artist create a recital program? On Tue, Dec 3, Chinese guitarist Xuefei Yang will give the second concert in the new 92Y at SubCulture series. She’s written an introduction to her program explaining her selections and her feelings towards the music.
My program takes you on a musical journey from the 1600s through 2013, and across Europe, South America and Asia. Along the way I will showcase three pieces that are considered 20th century masterworks for the instrument and give the world premiere of a piece from my homeland China.
The first half features the music of Benjamin Britten and Schubert. The year 2013 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of the British composer Benjamin Britten. He wrote just one piece for solo guitar, Nocturnal after John Dowland, for the British guitarist Julian Bream. It is based on the theme of sleep, and dreams. It is one of the most important pieces written for the instrument. I love this piece and want to play it for you in this centenary year.
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Britten’s Courtly Dances are from his opera Gloriana, set almost 500 years ago in the Royal Court of Queen Elizabeth I. In this anniversary year, I have transcribed the full set of dances for solo guitar. At first, I thought a couple of the dances were impossible to play, but I finally figured them out. So I hope you will agree with me that they work on the instrument and are a worthy addition to the guitar repertoire.
I always include a Romantic piece in my program, and this time I chose one of my all-time favourite Romantic composers, Franz Schubert whose music speaks to me directly. I have selected six of his songs, and I owe a debt of gratitude to the 19th century guitarist/composer Johann Kasper Mertz for these beautiful arrangements.
I will start the second half with the USA premiere of a piece (commissioned for me by Wigmore Hall in London) from the USA-based Chinese composer Chen Yi. I am very excited about this piece as it is the first I have received from a Chinese composer. It is based a Chinese folk-style called Shuo Chang which typically uses drums, singing and speaking to present a musical drama. This piece presents all these elements as a monodrama on a single guitar. I hope you will enjoy the sounds, colours and textures of this piece.
For the final two pieces of the second half, I chose two of the masterworks from the 20th century guitar repertoire. William Walton was a British composer who wrote these Five Bagatelles for Julian Bream. Although “Bagatelle” means a short, light piece, these are technically challenging to play. The pieces carry some of the warmth of the Italy, where Walton spent many years of his life.
The final piece is by Alberto Ginastera and written for Brazilian guitarist Carlos Barbosa Lima. His Sonata in four movements showcases and deconstructs the sounds, ambiance and rhythms of his native Argentina, ending in a frenzied and exciting finale to close the concert.

    How does an artist create a recital program? On Tue, Dec 3, Chinese guitarist Xuefei Yang will give the second concert in the new 92Y at SubCulture series. She’s written an introduction to her program explaining her selections and her feelings towards the music.

    My program takes you on a musical journey from the 1600s through 2013, and across Europe, South America and Asia. Along the way I will showcase three pieces that are considered 20th century masterworks for the instrument and give the world premiere of a piece from my homeland China.

    The first half features the music of Benjamin Britten and Schubert. The year 2013 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of the British composer Benjamin Britten. He wrote just one piece for solo guitar, Nocturnal after John Dowland, for the British guitarist Julian Bream. It is based on the theme of sleep, and dreams. It is one of the most important pieces written for the instrument. I love this piece and want to play it for you in this centenary year.

    Read More

  9. “200 years after their genesis, Beethoven’s quartets still hold tons of exciting questions for us.”
So says Rainer Schmidt, second violinist of the Hagen Quartet, in a Q&A with 92Y about the Quartet’s first complete Beethoven string quartet cycle in North America, currently underway. In its review of the Quartet’s first concert on Nov 7, The New York Times raved, “in the rich history of Beethoven cycles, this shapes up as a standout.”
The cycle continues Thu 14, Sat 16, & Sun 17.

    “200 years after their genesis, Beethoven’s quartets still hold tons of exciting questions for us.”

    So says Rainer Schmidt, second violinist of the Hagen Quartet, in a Q&A with 92Y about the Quartet’s first complete Beethoven string quartet cycle in North America, currently underway. In its review of the Quartet’s first concert on Nov 7, The New York Times raved, “in the rich history of Beethoven cycles, this shapes up as a standout.”

    The cycle continues Thu 14, Sat 16, & Sun 17.

  10. We visited pianist Jonathan Biss in his home for talk about Beethoven Sonatas, how he came to play the piano, and the pleasure of performing with his mother.

    Listen to Biss and his mother Miriam Fried, “a glorious combination,” perform at 92Y on Nov 2.