1. Like shoes? Or rather, obsessed? Valerie Steele, director and chief curator of The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, explores our culture’s fascination with extravagant shoes, at 92YTribeca on March 21.

    “Shoe Obsession,” an exhibit at The Museum at FIT, begins Feb 8. Art Info has more

  2. 

"I can barely remember my twenties, I’ll tell you that. It’s a great time. You’re young. You have energy. You have lots of sex with different people. It’s great. It’s also very hard. … It’s much harder today. I was able to get out of college and have a career. I started at a little paper in Rochester, NY and went to a bigger paper in Hazard, Kentucky. And then Louisville, Kentucky. And then Miami and then The Times. I could work my way up. And every place I get a better salary, more responsibility. Today I think it’s much harder. I see people in their 20s, writers, and they’re writing online, and they’re not getting compensated for what they should be getting compensated. Very exploitative. There doesn’t seem to be a mechanism. In the newspaper business there were unions that helped us through that. Today everybody’s their own person, and that’s wonderful in some way. And not only is it hurting 20 somethings, it’s hurting the established media."


That was Michael Winerip, editor, The New York Times “Booming” blog, a Baby Boomer and the father of twentysomethings, at 92YTribeca’s “Being Twentysomething” event on Nov 28. Watch the video. Winerip’s quote can be found at the 13:27 mark. 

    "I can barely remember my twenties, I’ll tell you that. It’s a great time. You’re young. You have energy. You have lots of sex with different people. It’s great. It’s also very hard. … It’s much harder today. I was able to get out of college and have a career. I started at a little paper in Rochester, NY and went to a bigger paper in Hazard, Kentucky. And then Louisville, Kentucky. And then Miami and then The Times. I could work my way up. And every place I get a better salary, more responsibility. Today I think it’s much harder. I see people in their 20s, writers, and they’re writing online, and they’re not getting compensated for what they should be getting compensated. Very exploitative. There doesn’t seem to be a mechanism. In the newspaper business there were unions that helped us through that. Today everybody’s their own person, and that’s wonderful in some way. And not only is it hurting 20 somethings, it’s hurting the established media."

    That was Michael Winerip, editor, The New York Times “Booming” blog, a Baby Boomer and the father of twentysomethings, at 92YTribeca’s “Being Twentysomething” event on Nov 28. Watch the video. Winerip’s quote can be found at the 13:27 mark. 

  3. Jack Hitt’s “Slumlord”

    In this video, writer Jack Hitt (This American Life, The New Yorker, Rolling Stone) shares his 1980s New York landlord story at the Annual MothSHOP All Star Review in 2006. You gotta hear it to believe it.

    His solo show, Making Up The Truth, just completed a November run at Joe’s Pub but you can catch him at 92YTribeca on Dec 5 in Randy Cohen’s Person Place Thing Live! series.

  4. Jawbreaker - “Save Your Generation”

    Is everyone going to the Being Twentysomething talk with Anna Holmes, Brian Stelter, Emily Gould, Michael Winerip, Robin Marantz Henig and Samantha Henig tonight at 92YTribeca?

  5. Emily Gould is the author of And The Heart Says Whatever, founder of Emily Books and a former Gawker writer. She’s taking part in the “Being Twentysomething” talk at 92YTribeca on Wed, Nov 28 with an all-star panel of experts who have given some thought to the trials and tribulations of being young. First, let’s check out the culture diet of the now thirtysomething.
Where do you go for news when you start your day?
I ritualistically listen to WNYC interspersed with WFUV while I make coffee, and I have the kind of coffeemaker you have to stand there and pour water through the filter manually so it takes a long time and I get my entire daily news dosage. My friend Ruth does the same thing and says it’s her “coffee-making practice,” like how some people have a “meditation practice.”
What are your favorite websites?
Lately it feels to me like the blogs I most love to read are all about parenting. I don’t know what that’s about, since I’m not a parent and not likely to be one anytime soon. I guess I’m sort of a domestic voyeur. One of my favorite blogs right now is called http://thekidhasarrived.tumblr.com/. I also love my friend Rebecca’s blog about her adventures in foster parenting.
How much do you use Twitter and Facebook (or other social networking services)?
Way, way, way, way too much. I periodically detox. I’m very all or nothing with them. My bookstore, Emily Books, is digital, so I use these services a lot to be in touch with our customers and subscribers — but that’s also an excuse for being addicted to them. Oops!
What book are you currently reading (or the last one you read)? Print or digital?
I am rereading Barbara Browning’s I’m Trying To Reach You, as an ebook. It was our November pick. It’s about a guy who gets obsessed with the idea that a mystery is unfolding in YouTube comments that involves the deaths of Michael Jackson, Les Paul, Pina Bausch and Merce Cunningham. It’s actually a lot less weird than that description makes it seem, and it’s very funny. It’s also largely set in the area downtown near NYU and upstate near Woodstock, and it’s fun to visit familiar places in fiction. You know, to see a block you know well immortalized. “It’s that crappy Morton Williams on Bleeker!” That kind of thing.
What magazines do you subscribe to?
Only the New Yorker and n+1. I sometimes get into a habit of buying Us Weekly on the newsstand, but it hasn’t been good since Janice Min left. I used to subscribe to Time Out New York but I cancelled my sub when they panned my book in an idiotic, sexist way. I’m sure they’re still reeling from the pain of losing me.
What are your current (or all time) favorite television shows?
I am super into “Homeland” right now, as are we all (right?) And I am hotly anticipating the return of “Game of Thrones,” to the point where I might wear a costume to watch the season 3 premiere. Even if I have to do that alone.
What’s the last movie you saw?
Lincoln. Yawn.
What’s the last performance (dance/opera/theater) you attended?
Edgar Oliver’s one man show at Theater 80, Helen and Edgar. Amazing!!
What’s the last music purchase you made?
Martha Wainwright’s new album, Come Home To Mama. Martha Wainwright is a magical witch from another world.
What radio shows or podcasts do you listen to?
My favorite podcast is Baby Geniuses, a podcast by Lisa Hanawalt and Emily Heller. I met Lisa ("met" on Twitter) when she drew a portrait of a cat in a leather vest in exchange for a leather vest I was trying to get rid of. Following her on Twitter is very enriching. See, social media is not all bad!
What’s your favorite piece of art on display in your home?
See above!
Where do you go / what do you do to “disconnect”?
This summer I stayed in Rosendale, New York for all of August. Rosendale is amazing and so weird and cool (and cheap.) I would like to do that again for the whole summer next year if possible. Or longer, except at this point in my derelict career I have a fear of becoming like one of those Edith Wharton characters who go from “summering” upstate to living there year-round and it means they have lost their fortune and are disgraced. I have definitely lost my fortune but am not yet disgraced. I hope I can stay in NYC for another little while.
Read previous Culture Klatsch entries here.

    Emily Gould is the author of And The Heart Says Whatever, founder of Emily Books and a former Gawker writer. She’s taking part in the “Being Twentysomething” talk at 92YTribeca on Wed, Nov 28 with an all-star panel of experts who have given some thought to the trials and tribulations of being young. First, let’s check out the culture diet of the now thirtysomething.

    Where do you go for news when you start your day?

    I ritualistically listen to WNYC interspersed with WFUV while I make coffee, and I have the kind of coffeemaker you have to stand there and pour water through the filter manually so it takes a long time and I get my entire daily news dosage. My friend Ruth does the same thing and says it’s her “coffee-making practice,” like how some people have a “meditation practice.”

    What are your favorite websites?

    Lately it feels to me like the blogs I most love to read are all about parenting. I don’t know what that’s about, since I’m not a parent and not likely to be one anytime soon. I guess I’m sort of a domestic voyeur. One of my favorite blogs right now is called http://thekidhasarrived.tumblr.com/. I also love my friend Rebecca’s blog about her adventures in foster parenting.

    How much do you use Twitter and Facebook (or other social networking services)?

    Way, way, way, way too much. I periodically detox. I’m very all or nothing with them. My bookstore, Emily Books, is digital, so I use these services a lot to be in touch with our customers and subscribers — but that’s also an excuse for being addicted to them. Oops!

    What book are you currently reading (or the last one you read)? Print or digital?

    I am rereading Barbara Browning’s I’m Trying To Reach You, as an ebook. It was our November pick. It’s about a guy who gets obsessed with the idea that a mystery is unfolding in YouTube comments that involves the deaths of Michael Jackson, Les Paul, Pina Bausch and Merce Cunningham. It’s actually a lot less weird than that description makes it seem, and it’s very funny. It’s also largely set in the area downtown near NYU and upstate near Woodstock, and it’s fun to visit familiar places in fiction. You know, to see a block you know well immortalized. “It’s that crappy Morton Williams on Bleeker!” That kind of thing.

    What magazines do you subscribe to?

    Only the New Yorker and n+1. I sometimes get into a habit of buying Us Weekly on the newsstand, but it hasn’t been good since Janice Min left. I used to subscribe to Time Out New York but I cancelled my sub when they panned my book in an idiotic, sexist way. I’m sure they’re still reeling from the pain of losing me.

    What are your current (or all time) favorite television shows?

    I am super into “Homeland” right now, as are we all (right?) And I am hotly anticipating the return of “Game of Thrones,” to the point where I might wear a costume to watch the season 3 premiere. Even if I have to do that alone.

    What’s the last movie you saw?

    Lincoln. Yawn.

    What’s the last performance (dance/opera/theater) you attended?

    Edgar Oliver’s one man show at Theater 80, Helen and Edgar. Amazing!!

    What’s the last music purchase you made?

    Martha Wainwright’s new album, Come Home To Mama. Martha Wainwright is a magical witch from another world.

    What radio shows or podcasts do you listen to?

    My favorite podcast is Baby Geniuses, a podcast by Lisa Hanawalt and Emily Heller. I met Lisa ("met" on Twitter) when she drew a portrait of a cat in a leather vest in exchange for a leather vest I was trying to get rid of. Following her on Twitter is very enriching. See, social media is not all bad!

    What’s your favorite piece of art on display in your home?

    See above!

    Where do you go / what do you do to “disconnect”?

    This summer I stayed in Rosendale, New York for all of August. Rosendale is amazing and so weird and cool (and cheap.) I would like to do that again for the whole summer next year if possible. Or longer, except at this point in my derelict career I have a fear of becoming like one of those Edith Wharton characters who go from “summering” upstate to living there year-round and it means they have lost their fortune and are disgraced. I have definitely lost my fortune but am not yet disgraced. I hope I can stay in NYC for another little while.

    Read previous Culture Klatsch entries here.

  6. In the wake of the Guy Fieri NY Times dust-up, now’s a good time to take a look at Financial Times restaurant critic and author Nicholas Lander’s new book, The Art of the Restaurateur. From a book review in The Economist:

The past 30 years have been a golden age for restaurants, argues Nicholas Lander. They have emerged in the “most unlikely of locations, serving the most extraordinary food, and attracting the most exceptional following.” Celebrity chefs have received most of the credit for that. But their position is “overly lofty” in Mr Lander’s view. Great cooks do not necessarily make great restaurants. Atmosphere, design, location and organisation matter, too. Food that is interesting to cook or impressive to look at may not be what people actually want to eat. Making the customer truly happy is the job, often unsung, of the restaurateur, who risks his money (and sometimes health, marriage and sanity) in one of the most stressful jobs in the world.

Tonight at 92YTribeca, you can join Nicholas Lander, restaurateurs Will Guidara (Eleven Madison Park, NoMad), famed hospitality interior designer Adam D. Tihany (Per Se, Daniel), and writer Bill Buford for a discussion on the unsung art of the restaurateur and how the owner’s creative vision can often be the difference in making a restaurant successful.
And even though Cafe 92YTribeca doesn’t have any Donkey Sauce, it still gets really good reviews.

    In the wake of the Guy Fieri NY Times dust-up, now’s a good time to take a look at Financial Times restaurant critic and author Nicholas Lander’s new book, The Art of the Restaurateur. From a book review in The Economist:

    The past 30 years have been a golden age for restaurants, argues Nicholas Lander. They have emerged in the “most unlikely of locations, serving the most extraordinary food, and attracting the most exceptional following.” Celebrity chefs have received most of the credit for that. But their position is “overly lofty” in Mr Lander’s view. Great cooks do not necessarily make great restaurants. Atmosphere, design, location and organisation matter, too. Food that is interesting to cook or impressive to look at may not be what people actually want to eat. Making the customer truly happy is the job, often unsung, of the restaurateur, who risks his money (and sometimes health, marriage and sanity) in one of the most stressful jobs in the world.

    Tonight at 92YTribeca, you can join Nicholas Lander, restaurateurs Will Guidara (Eleven Madison Park, NoMad), famed hospitality interior designer Adam D. Tihany (Per Se, Daniel), and writer Bill Buford for a discussion on the unsung art of the restaurateur and how the owner’s creative vision can often be the difference in making a restaurant successful.

    And even though Cafe 92YTribeca doesn’t have any Donkey Sauce, it still gets really good reviews.

  7. areasofmyexpertise:

You know this joke don’t you? A newspaper judge and former newspaper ethicist walk into the 92Y Tribeca. 
I will be a guest on Randy Cohen’s “PERSON PLACE THING” next week in Manhattan, NY. 
Details are HERE.

We’ll be there! We are there.

    areasofmyexpertise:

    You know this joke don’t you? A newspaper judge and former newspaper ethicist walk into the 92Y Tribeca. 

    I will be a guest on Randy Cohen’s “PERSON PLACE THING” next week in Manhattan, NY. 

    Details are HERE.

    We’ll be there! We are there.

  8. Did you know Kevin Bleyer, writer for The Daily Show, wrote President Obama’s standup routine for the White House Correspondents Dinner and other speeches? Did you know he just published a book, Me the People: One Man’s Selfless Quest to Rewrite the Constitution of the United States of America? Did you know he shot a trailer for the book that features Daily Show correspondents Jason Jones and Samantha Bee that you can watch above? Did you know Kevin will be appearing at 92YTribeca on July 9 with BuzzFeed’s Ben Smith to talk about it?

    Now that you’re equipped with this vital information, have a great 4th of July week.

  9. comedycentral:

Daily Show writer Kevin Bleyer rewrote the Constitution for his new book, Me the People: One Man’s Selfless Quest to Rewrite the Constitution of the United States of America.
Jon Stewart says, “I would rather read a constitution written by Kevin Bleyer than by the sharpest minds in the country.”

Kevin Bleyer will be talking about the book at 92YTribeca on July 9 with Buzzfeed’s Ben Smith. We’ve had an advance copy in the office and everyone has been fawning over it.

    comedycentral:

    Daily Show writer Kevin Bleyer rewrote the Constitution for his new book, Me the People: One Man’s Selfless Quest to Rewrite the Constitution of the United States of America.

    Jon Stewart says, “I would rather read a constitution written by Kevin Bleyer than by the sharpest minds in the country.”

    Kevin Bleyer will be talking about the book at 92YTribeca on July 9 with Buzzfeed’s Ben Smith. We’ve had an advance copy in the office and everyone has been fawning over it.

  10. Kurt Gutenbrunner On The Lack Of Café Culture In America

Kurt Gutenbrunner is chef and co-owner of Wallsé, Blaue Gans, the Upholstery Store, Cafe Kristall and Viennese coffeehouse Café Sabarsky. 

He recently did an interview The Village Voice's Fork in the Road blog about his new book, Neue Cuisine: The Elegant Tastes of Vienna. Fork in the Road asked him about a lack of “café culture” in America. In the book, you talk a lot about the Austria’s café culture. Why do you think we don’t see that here in America as much?

It’s all about history. We didn’t know about coffee before the Turks came to Vienna in 1600. When the Turks came, we fought them back and then they left us the coffee. And it took time for us to figure out what do with it and so we invented the coffeehouse. In the 1800s and 1900s, all the artists used to work out of the coffeehouses so they became a meeting point for interaction and to hang out and work together. It became this culture of sitting in a café all day long and you have snacks and coffee and cakes. It’s a very Central European mentality that you also see in Budapest and around Eastern Europe.Read the full interview here. 

Kurt Gutenbrunner, Harvey Sachs and the Ensemble for the Romantic Century will all be at 92YTribeca on November 13 for Eat, Drink & Think Like…Beethoven. This will be an in-depth look into Beethoven and his world. Listen and watch as musicians and actors from the Ensemble for the Romantic Century bring his story to life. Learn about Viennese Kaffeehaus culture as you taste historically accurate pastries and drinks.

Like Time Out New York said. “Non-boring lectures." 

(Photo via)

    Kurt Gutenbrunner On The Lack Of Café Culture In America

    Kurt Gutenbrunner is chef and co-owner of Wallsé, Blaue Gans, the Upholstery Store, Cafe Kristall and Viennese coffeehouse Café Sabarsky.

    He recently did an interview The Village Voice's Fork in the Road blog about his new book, Neue Cuisine: The Elegant Tastes of Vienna. Fork in the Road asked him about a lack of “café culture” in America.

    In the book, you talk a lot about the Austria’s café culture. Why do you think we don’t see that here in America as much?

    It’s all about history. We didn’t know about coffee before the Turks came to Vienna in 1600. When the Turks came, we fought them back and then they left us the coffee. And it took time for us to figure out what do with it and so we invented the coffeehouse. In the 1800s and 1900s, all the artists used to work out of the coffeehouses so they became a meeting point for interaction and to hang out and work together. It became this culture of sitting in a café all day long and you have snacks and coffee and cakes. It’s a very Central European mentality that you also see in Budapest and around Eastern Europe.

    Read the full interview here.

    Kurt Gutenbrunner, Harvey Sachs and the Ensemble for the Romantic Century will all be at 92YTribeca on November 13 for Eat, Drink & Think Like…Beethoven. This will be an in-depth look into Beethoven and his world. Listen and watch as musicians and actors from the Ensemble for the Romantic Century bring his story to life. Learn about Viennese Kaffeehaus culture as you taste historically accurate pastries and drinks.

    Like Time Out New York said. “Non-boring lectures."

    (Photo via)