1. “200 years after their genesis, Beethoven’s quartets still hold tons of exciting questions for us.”
So says Rainer Schmidt, second violinist of the Hagen Quartet, in a Q&A with 92Y about the Quartet’s first complete Beethoven string quartet cycle in North America, currently underway. In its review of the Quartet’s first concert on Nov 7, The New York Times raved, “in the rich history of Beethoven cycles, this shapes up as a standout.”
The cycle continues Thu 14, Sat 16, & Sun 17.

    “200 years after their genesis, Beethoven’s quartets still hold tons of exciting questions for us.”

    So says Rainer Schmidt, second violinist of the Hagen Quartet, in a Q&A with 92Y about the Quartet’s first complete Beethoven string quartet cycle in North America, currently underway. In its review of the Quartet’s first concert on Nov 7, The New York Times raved, “in the rich history of Beethoven cycles, this shapes up as a standout.”

    The cycle continues Thu 14, Sat 16, & Sun 17.

  2. We visited pianist Jonathan Biss in his home for talk about Beethoven Sonatas, how he came to play the piano, and the pleasure of performing with his mother.

    Listen to Biss and his mother Miriam Fried, “a glorious combination,” perform at 92Y on Nov 2.

  3. What makes Beethoven so enduring and so popular? 
That’s one of the questions we asked Orli Shaham, artistic director of the pre-school program Baby Got Bach, in a recent interview about her all-Beethoven Family Concert this Sunday at 92Y. The concert kicks off a month of Beethoven at 92Y. 
So what makes Beethoven so enduring and so popular?  [[MORE]]
"Beethoven is one of those mythical characters who excites us when we even just hear his name. He and his music are so emotional, so filled with romanticism; he captures our imagination. I think it can be especially true for kids. There is something about that Beethovean energy that I think will spark their interest and creativity." 
What do you hope the audience will gain from the concert experience?
"Our plan is for the kids—and their parents—to get the feeling of what it must have been like to be Beethoven, so we’ll talk about the different aspects of his life and of his sound world, and how that affected his music.
But even more, we want to give everyone a sense of what it must be like to have all those ideas swirling around in your head all the time, and give them the chance to experience what it’s like to compose music. With any luck, we’ll trigger their own creativity and show them that they too have something important to say. We’ll give them the example of how a creative genius like Beethoven goes about saying it.” 
Tell us about your narrator, Naomi Lewin, and why you asked her to join you.
"I’ve known Naomi for many years. She’s the afternoon host for WQXR but even more importantly, she does the “Classics for Kids” program out of Cincinnati, which is one of the best programs out there that acquaints kids with music; it tells the stories behind the music that kids will understand and appreciate.
She knows so well how to talk to kids about music, so when this opportunity came up, I knew she would be my perfect partner. She’ll do most of the talking, and I’ll do most of the playing along with my two other guests, violinist Adam Barnett-Hart and cellist Caroline Stinson.
We’ll have lots of little bits of Beethoven’s music. We won’t overwhelm the kids with 20 minutes from a single work but they’ll get a good 20 minutes or more of Beethoven’s music.” 
This Sunday, Oct 27 at 3 pm, Orli Shaham presents an all-Beethoven Family Concert for ages 6 and older. 

    What makes Beethoven so enduring and so popular? 

    That’s one of the questions we asked Orli Shaham, artistic director of the pre-school program Baby Got Bach, in a recent interview about her all-Beethoven Family Concert this Sunday at 92Y. The concert kicks off a month of Beethoven at 92Y. 

    So what makes Beethoven so enduring and so popular?  

    Read More

  4. Y Beethoven? This is Why Beethoven, according to Shai Wosner, Orli Shaham, Julien Labro, Jonathan Biss, Benjamin Hochman and Jenny Lin.

    “It’s not been possible to be a composer since 1827,” Biss told us, “without having something to say about Beethoven, like it or not.”

    We want to hear from you, too. Tell us, Why Beethoven? We’ll feature your comments on our Tumblr and Twitter, using the hashtag #YBeethoven.

    The brilliant Hagen Quartet brings the complete Beethoven cycle to 92Y in November.

  5. Kurt Gutenbrunner On The Lack Of Café Culture In America

Kurt Gutenbrunner is chef and co-owner of Wallsé, Blaue Gans, the Upholstery Store, Cafe Kristall and Viennese coffeehouse Café Sabarsky. 

He recently did an interview The Village Voice's Fork in the Road blog about his new book, Neue Cuisine: The Elegant Tastes of Vienna. Fork in the Road asked him about a lack of “café culture” in America. In the book, you talk a lot about the Austria’s café culture. Why do you think we don’t see that here in America as much?

It’s all about history. We didn’t know about coffee before the Turks came to Vienna in 1600. When the Turks came, we fought them back and then they left us the coffee. And it took time for us to figure out what do with it and so we invented the coffeehouse. In the 1800s and 1900s, all the artists used to work out of the coffeehouses so they became a meeting point for interaction and to hang out and work together. It became this culture of sitting in a café all day long and you have snacks and coffee and cakes. It’s a very Central European mentality that you also see in Budapest and around Eastern Europe.Read the full interview here. 

Kurt Gutenbrunner, Harvey Sachs and the Ensemble for the Romantic Century will all be at 92YTribeca on November 13 for Eat, Drink & Think Like…Beethoven. This will be an in-depth look into Beethoven and his world. Listen and watch as musicians and actors from the Ensemble for the Romantic Century bring his story to life. Learn about Viennese Kaffeehaus culture as you taste historically accurate pastries and drinks.

Like Time Out New York said. “Non-boring lectures." 

(Photo via)

    Kurt Gutenbrunner On The Lack Of Café Culture In America

    Kurt Gutenbrunner is chef and co-owner of Wallsé, Blaue Gans, the Upholstery Store, Cafe Kristall and Viennese coffeehouse Café Sabarsky.

    He recently did an interview The Village Voice's Fork in the Road blog about his new book, Neue Cuisine: The Elegant Tastes of Vienna. Fork in the Road asked him about a lack of “café culture” in America.

    In the book, you talk a lot about the Austria’s café culture. Why do you think we don’t see that here in America as much?

    It’s all about history. We didn’t know about coffee before the Turks came to Vienna in 1600. When the Turks came, we fought them back and then they left us the coffee. And it took time for us to figure out what do with it and so we invented the coffeehouse. In the 1800s and 1900s, all the artists used to work out of the coffeehouses so they became a meeting point for interaction and to hang out and work together. It became this culture of sitting in a café all day long and you have snacks and coffee and cakes. It’s a very Central European mentality that you also see in Budapest and around Eastern Europe.

    Read the full interview here.

    Kurt Gutenbrunner, Harvey Sachs and the Ensemble for the Romantic Century will all be at 92YTribeca on November 13 for Eat, Drink & Think Like…Beethoven. This will be an in-depth look into Beethoven and his world. Listen and watch as musicians and actors from the Ensemble for the Romantic Century bring his story to life. Learn about Viennese Kaffeehaus culture as you taste historically accurate pastries and drinks.

    Like Time Out New York said. “Non-boring lectures."

    (Photo via)