1. Tuesday Tip: How to Reglaze Ceramicsby JJ Peet, 92Y Ceramics Center instructor Ceramic pieces often come out of the kiln with glazing that is less than desirable. Re-glazing already fired work is difficult, at best, as the glaze cannot be absorbed by the non-porous clay.  A solution to this problem is to add one drop of liquid soap to 6oz of glaze that has been warmed under a heat lamp or in a kiln at a temperature of approximately 115F. The soap thickens the glaze and the warm surface allows it to adhere. The glaze or slip can then be applied by brush or poured.  While not like a bisque surface, the combination creates a workable solution to an often difficult problem.  Master the art of the glaze yourself and join JJ Peet for a class in Handbuilidng and Wheel this fall!

    Tuesday Tip: How to Reglaze Ceramics
    by JJ Peet, 92Y Ceramics Center instructor

    Ceramic pieces often come out of the kiln with glazing that is less than desirable. Re-glazing already fired work is difficult, at best, as the glaze cannot be absorbed by the non-porous clay.

    A solution to this problem is to add one drop of liquid soap to 6oz of glaze that has been warmed under a heat lamp or in a kiln at a temperature of approximately 115F. The soap thickens the glaze and the warm surface allows it to adhere. The glaze or slip can then be applied by brush or poured.

    While not like a bisque surface, the combination creates a workable solution to an often difficult problem.

    Master the art of the glaze yourself and join JJ Peet for a class in Handbuilidng and Wheel this fall!

  2. #TuesdayTip How to Slip Inlay for Pottery Projectsby Sarah Emond, M.A. in Sculpture and 92Y InstructorSlip—a suspension of water in clay for the purposes of decoration.
Carve a groove approximately 1/16 of an inch deep into leather hard clay.
Apply slip into and over the grooves with a paint brush and wait until it is completely dry.
When it is dry, use a metal rib tool to scrape the excess slip away.
Scrape in the same direction as the groove in order to keep the groove free of the clay body.
In the picture, the vertical grooves were carved by hand when the clay was leather hard. The horizontal groove was carved on the wheel when the cup was bone dry. You can clearly see the difference in edges and straightness of the groove.
Ready to learn more and experiment with slips on your own? Get started in a Basic Handbuilding and Wheel class with Sarah this summer!

    #TuesdayTip How to Slip Inlay for Pottery Projects
    by Sarah Emond, M.A. in Sculpture and 92Y Instructor

    Slip—a suspension of water in clay for the purposes of decoration.

    1. Carve a groove approximately 1/16 of an inch deep into leather hard clay.
    2. Apply slip into and over the grooves with a paint brush and wait until it is completely dry.
    3. When it is dry, use a metal rib tool to scrape the excess slip away.
    4. Scrape in the same direction as the groove in order to keep the groove free of the clay body.

    In the picture, the vertical grooves were carved by hand when the clay was leather hard. The horizontal groove was carved on the wheel when the cup was bone dry. You can clearly see the difference in edges and straightness of the groove.

    Ready to learn more and experiment with slips on your own? Get started in a Basic Handbuilding and Wheel class with Sarah this summer!

  3. #TuesdayTip: Monoprinting for CeramicsBy Chadwick Augustine, MFA and 92Y Ceramics Center Instructor Want to get a cool new design onto your DIY ceramic ware? Using a plaster slab to transfer a slip design onto clay can be a good way to do it! This monoprint technique of applying colored slips, or layers of color transferred through water, to plaster and then pressing soft clay onto the design is most often used in creating decorative slabs and tiles. Try using the same process in any plaster dish mold as a way to explore themes and series within a set of plates or bowls. For best transfer results, allow slip design to dry fully on plaster before pressing soft, dampened clay into the mold. Also, try varying the viscosity of your slips from very thin to thick to get greater depth in your surface—from thin veils of color to opaque color fields and lines.  Join Chadwick this spring to learn about slips and more in his class on Handbuilding and Wheel!

    #TuesdayTip: Monoprinting for Ceramics
    By Chadwick Augustine, MFA and 92Y Ceramics Center Instructor

    Want to get a cool new design onto your DIY ceramic ware? Using a plaster slab to transfer a slip design onto clay can be a good way to do it! This monoprint technique of applying colored slips, or layers of color transferred through water, to plaster and then pressing soft clay onto the design is most often used in creating decorative slabs and tiles. Try using the same process in any plaster dish mold as a way to explore themes and series within a set of plates or bowls.

    For best transfer results, allow slip design to dry fully on plaster before pressing soft, dampened clay into the mold. Also, try varying the viscosity of your slips from very thin to thick to get greater depth in your surface—from thin veils of color to opaque color fields and lines.

    Join Chadwick this spring to learn about slips and more in his class on Handbuilding and Wheel!

  4. #TuesdayTip: A Very DIY Holiday! The 92Y Ceramics Department toasts the holidays with a Flask Tutorial [PDF] by instructor Bethany Pelle. Happy drinking!

    #TuesdayTip: A Very DIY Holiday! The 92Y Ceramics Department toasts the holidays with a Flask Tutorial [PDF] by instructor Bethany Pelle. Happy drinking!

  5. Artist Tom Sachs working on his next piece at 92Y Ceramics, learning the craft with ceramics instructor J.J. Peet. 
Previously.

    Artist Tom Sachs working on his next piece at 92Y Ceramics, learning the craft with ceramics instructor J.J. Peet.

    Previously.

    (Source: facebook.com)

  6. Artist Tom Sachs made his first “perfect” tea bowl at 92Y. He’s learning the craft of ceramics at 92Y, under the tutelage of ceramics instructor J.J. Peet. Does his tea cup look familiar? 

    Artist Tom Sachs made his first “perfect” tea bowl at 92Y. He’s learning the craft of ceramics at 92Y, under the tutelage of ceramics instructor J.J. Peet. Does his tea cup look familiar