1. James Salter speaks to high school students at 92Y on Mon, in the Poetry Center’s Schools Project. The purple socks are Richard Ford’s. Photograph by Nancy Crampton.
Read about their readings at 92Y later on in the evening, on Slate and ArtsBeat.

    James Salter speaks to high school students at 92Y on Mon, in the Poetry Center’s Schools Project. The purple socks are Richard Ford’s. Photograph by Nancy Crampton.

    Read about their readings at 92Y later on in the evening, on Slate and ArtsBeat.

  2. We’re live tweeting tonight’s readings with Richard Ford and James Salter, starting now! Join us. 

  3. Sam Waterston, Charlotte Rampling and Robie Porter in James Salter's lost film, “Three” (1969).

    Susan Sontag introduced James Salter at a 92Y reading in 1997 with “If he can be described as a writer’s writer, then I think it’s just as true to say he’s a reader’s writer; that is, he’s a writer who particularly rewards those for whom reading is an intense pleasure and something that is a bit of an addiction. I myself put James Salter among the very few North American writers all of whose work I want to read and whose as yet unpublished books I wait for impatiently.”

    Salter returns to 92Y on Monday night (Apr 29) with Richard Ford.

  4. From the Poetry Center Archive: James Salter—A Great American Writer
     
    James Salter makes his long-awaited return to 92Y on Monday night (Apr 29), reading from his new novel, All That Is, and sharing the stage with Richard Ford, who has said that “Salter writes American sentences better than anybody writing today.”
     
    In anticipation, we’ve uploaded a 1997 recording of Salter reading from his memoir Burning the Days. He was introduced by Susan Sontag, who echoed Ford’s sentiment.

    Read More

  5. Almost famous?
James Salter is 87. He’s written his first novel in 30 years – and The New Yorker wonders whether he’s finally about to become a “Famous Writer.”
Salter gives the only NYC reading of his new book at 92Y on Apr 29. The New Yorker piece got us thinking. Are there other writers who should be household names, but aren’t? Let us know below. We’ll do a round up of your answers in a later post. And we’ll randomly select one entry and award them two tickets to the reading!
What other writers do you think should be famously known, but aren’t?

    Almost famous?

    James Salter is 87. He’s written his first novel in 30 years – and The New Yorker wonders whether he’s finally about to become a “Famous Writer.”

    Salter gives the only NYC reading of his new book at 92Y on Apr 29.

    The New Yorker piece got us thinking. Are there other writers who should be household names, but aren’t? Let us know below. We’ll do a round up of your answers in a later post. And we’ll randomly select one entry and award them two tickets to the reading!


    What other writers do you think should be famously known, but aren’t?