1. The High Holidays are a time steeped in tradition, with prayers and chants passed down through generations. You know what else is steeped in tradition? The blues. So it’s not so meshuggah for a service to blend the two.

    Rabbi Dan Ain does just that when he leads Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur services with musician Jeremiah Lockwood on September 25 and October 3 and 4 at Roulette in Brooklyn.

    Lockwood is a virtuoso of that blues/Jewish chant blend, having learned one tradition from the late blues master Carolina Slim and the other from his grandfather, Cantor Jacob Konigsberg. Check out his jazzed up version of “Avenu Malkeinu Z’khor” at the Festival of Jewish Culture in Krakow here.

    And you too can learn to chant the Jeremiah Lockwood way! Lockwood has helpfully provided instructional videos to some of the High Holiday Hits. Click here to learn the verses to “Avinu Malkeinu,” “Ashamnu” and more.

  2. Gilbert Gottfried talks about apologizing for a joke (perhaps you remember) with Rabbi Dan Ain at 92YTribeca. What do you atone for? Here’s your chance to observe Yom Kippur with Rabbi Dan and The Sway Machinery’s Jeremiah Lockwood. But you have to meeeeeaaan it.

    Previously: Gilbert Gottfried riffs on non-practicing Jews.

  3. If you’re around a radio/computer this afternoon at 2 pm, tune in to WNYC’s Soundcheck to hear author Antonino D’Ambrosio discuss his book on the making of Johnny Cash’s largely forgotten album, Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian.. 

Antonino will be at 92YTribeca next Wednesday, May 11, with Jeremiah Lockwood. The two will tell the astonishing story—in word, photographs and song—behind Johnny Cash’s virtually unknown folk protest record.

    If you’re around a radio/computer this afternoon at 2 pm, tune in to WNYC’s Soundcheck to hear author Antonino D’Ambrosio discuss his book on the making of Johnny Cash’s largely forgotten album, Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian..

    Antonino will be at 92YTribeca next Wednesday, May 11, with Jeremiah Lockwood. The two will tell the astonishing story—in word, photographs and song—behind Johnny Cash’s virtually unknown folk protest record.