1. When you practice, start in the middle sometimes. Start in different spots, out of order. Always starting at the beginning of the piece can get you in a rut, making you less attentive. Then when you memorize the piece, you might only remember the beginning!

    — John McCauley, piano instructor, 92Y School of Music

  2. 5 Things We Learned About Lenny Kravitz Last Night Ultra cool rocker and style icon Lenny Kravitz commanded cat calls and praise from the 92Y audience on September 19. The musician, actor, and all-around talented artist sat down with Rolling Stone’s Anthony DeCurtis to discuss his acclaimed career and new album, Strut. Here are 5 things we learned about Lenny Kravitz last night.
Kravitz wrote “Fly Away” while driving his daughter Zoë to school in Nassau.
Robert Plant cursed him out. While the two were touring together, the Led Zeppelin band member straightened out Kravitz, who was coming off an “attitude.” Kravitz grinned and said, “I got cursed out by my idol.”
Kravitz was “almost” bar mitzahed. “Because I had this afro, the yarmulke wouldn’t stay,” Kravitz joked, commenting on his bi-racial background from his African American mother and Jewish father.
He’s living his mother’s dreams. Kravitz has made many life decisions, such as establishing a home in Paris, because his mother, The Jeffersons actress Roxie Roker, never got to accomplish them herself (she died in 1995 from breast cancer). “I’m living the life she wanted to lead,” Kravitz said. “I’m doing it for both of us.”
Kravitz really loves his fans. He proved that by remaining on stage for 10 minutes after his talk concluded, signing autographs and taking pictures with the audience.

    5 Things We Learned About Lenny Kravitz Last Night

    Ultra cool rocker and style icon Lenny Kravitz commanded cat calls and praise from the 92Y audience on September 19. The musician, actor, and all-around talented artist sat down with Rolling Stone’s Anthony DeCurtis to discuss his acclaimed career and new album, Strut. Here are 5 things we learned about Lenny Kravitz last night.

    1. Kravitz wrote “Fly Away” while driving his daughter Zoë to school in Nassau.
    2. Robert Plant cursed him out. While the two were touring together, the Led Zeppelin band member straightened out Kravitz, who was coming off an “attitude.” Kravitz grinned and said, “I got cursed out by my idol.”
    3. Kravitz was “almost” bar mitzahed. “Because I had this afro, the yarmulke wouldn’t stay,” Kravitz joked, commenting on his bi-racial background from his African American mother and Jewish father.
    4. He’s living his mother’s dreams. Kravitz has made many life decisions, such as establishing a home in Paris, because his mother, The Jeffersons actress Roxie Roker, never got to accomplish them herself (she died in 1995 from breast cancer). “I’m living the life she wanted to lead,” Kravitz said. “I’m doing it for both of us.”
    5. Kravitz really loves his fans. He proved that by remaining on stage for 10 minutes after his talk concluded, signing autographs and taking pictures with the audience.

  3. These are the songs Aretha Franklin is covering on her next album, honoring 10 great divas.
Are you as excited as we are? We’re having a listening party and discussion with the Queen of Soul herself, as well as music industry legend Clive Davis, on October 1. Come be a part of music history, as these two icons take the stage together in a rare appearance.

    These are the songs Aretha Franklin is covering on her next album, honoring 10 great divas.

    Are you as excited as we are? We’re having a listening party and discussion with the Queen of Soul herself, as well as music industry legend Clive Davis, on October 1. Come be a part of music history, as these two icons take the stage together in a rare appearance.

  4. The masterful Christian Tetzlaff opened the 92Y Concerts season with one of the monuments of Western music—the complete Bach Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin. “Hearing all six of these works in [a single performance],” wrote The New York Times, “is a kind of classical music nirvana.”

    Guests agreed. A “monumental performance,” wrote @jo on Twitter. “The fall’s first spiritual peak,” said @BruceHodgesNY
    .

    Read more about this marathon achievement:

    Tetzlaff Plays Bach: By the Numbers.
    Christian Tetzlaff on the Chaconne.
    5 Great Pop Culture Marathons.
    7 Facts about Bach’s Sonatas & Partitas That Will Amaze You. 

    Photos: Christian Tetzlaff, Viloin; Opening Night 2014—Tetzlaff Plays Bach; Complete Bach Sonatas & Partitas for solo violin; concert photographed: Thursday, September 18, 2014; 7:00 PM; Kaufmann Concert Hall; 92nd Street Y; New York, NY.

    Photograph: © 2014 Richard Termine (for 92nd Street Y).

    PHOTO CREDIT - Richard Termine for 92nd Street Y © 2014 Richard Termine

  5. Lenny Kravitz is coming to 92Y! One of the coolest artists in rock and a fashion trendsetter, Lenny will sit down with Rolling Stone's Anthony DeCurtis on September 19 to discuss his career in music, film, and his latest album Strut.
Enter to win two tickets to the event by tweeting us your favorite Lenny look through the years! Just hashtag #92YLennylooks.
So, what’s your favorite Lenny Kravitz look?

    Lenny Kravitz is coming to 92Y! One of the coolest artists in rock and a fashion trendsetter, Lenny will sit down with Rolling Stone's Anthony DeCurtis on September 19 to discuss his career in music, film, and his latest album Strut.

    Enter to win two tickets to the event by tweeting us your favorite Lenny look through the years! Just hashtag #92YLennylooks.

    So, what’s your favorite Lenny Kravitz look?

  6. Austin City Limits Web Exclusive: The Milk Carton Kids and Sarah Jarosz “Years Gone By”

    "These guys are the best thing that’s happened to music in the last 3 decades!"


    Congrats to The Milk Carton Kids and Sarah Jarosz, up for awards at the 2014 Americana Honors & Awards tonight!

    Rolling Stone named them a “must-see” this year.  Do that on Oct 18 at 92Y in a very special evening of collaborative performance in front of one microphone.

  7. Each and every time you pick up your instrument, from the first note of the day to the last, have a plan. That plan can be as simple as to make the most beautiful sound you can. This will take your practice session from passively playing random notes to active engagement.

    — Debbie Schmidt, Director of Chamber Music Program, Brass faculty

  8. Sunday Notes from 92Y’s School of Music Staff: Music on the Brain

    Welcome to our new blog series Sunday Notes, which features staff picks from the musical minds of 92Y’s School of Music. Today, private piano and group keyboard and theory instructor Mandy Chiu shares a video she found that illustrates the benefits playing an instrument has on the brain.

    Being a teacher for over 20 years, I always knew that playing music not only makes one feels amazing, it also brings clarity to the mind. I was really excited to come across this video, which shows scientific research on how music playing affects the brain!

    Interested in taking a piano class with Mandy? Sign up here!

  9. Tetzlaff Plays Bach: By the Numbers When you attend an artistic performance, the audience rarely knows the nitty gritty details of all that went into presenting it. For 92Y Concerts’ opening night on September 18, we are breaking down Christian Tetzlaff’s solo performance by the numbers. The German violinist will be performing Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas in full—a marathon achievement. Here’s how the evening stacks up! 2412 bars of music (without repeats).2400 seconds of intermission.1800 eyes on stage.900 glasses of champagne served at intermission.380 calories burned (approx.) by Tetzlaff.212 years since the Sonatas and Partitas were published.130 minutes on stage to perform.64 variations in the famous Chaconne.28 movements.17 years for Bach to compose.12 years old—the age when Tetzlaff first started learning the pieces.6 works.1 violinist.
You’ve seen the numbers, now hear the music on September 18!

    Tetzlaff Plays Bach: By the Numbers

    When you attend an artistic performance, the audience rarely knows the nitty gritty details of all that went into presenting it. For 92Y Concerts’ opening night on September 18, we are breaking down Christian Tetzlaff’s solo performance by the numbers. The German violinist will be performing Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas in full—a marathon achievement. Here’s how the evening stacks up!

    2412 bars of music (without repeats).
    2400 seconds of intermission.
    1800 eyes on stage.
    900 glasses of champagne served at intermission.
    380 calories burned (approx.) by Tetzlaff.
    212 years since the Sonatas and Partitas were published.
    130 minutes on stage to perform.
    64 variations in the famous Chaconne.
    28 movements.
    17 years for Bach to compose.
    12 years old—the age when Tetzlaff first started learning the pieces.
    6 works.
    1 violinist.

    You’ve seen the numbers, now hear the music on September 18!

  10. On September 19, Christian Tetzlaff opens the 92Y Concerts season with a performance of the complete Bach Sonatas and Partitas—one of the monuments of Western music.
While the six individual sonatas and partitas are regularly performed, Christian Tetzlaff is one of only a few artists who present the complete cycle as in a single epic program. In the following Q&A with 92Y, he discusses his thoughts and experience with Bach and the cycle.

So the entire cycle turns on the Chaconne? Yes, it is such a devastating piece of music. It is thirteen minutes long and connected to the other movements in the partita, and yet it towers above everything else. And then after such music—where could one possibly go? Even Bach doesn’t know. In his manuscript, the Chaconne stops and then the next sonata—which is supposed to be in C major—starts directly on the next line in the same register, same rhythm, same tempo, and even by the fifth measure, in the same key—D minor.

Read the full enlightening Q&A here.
Previously: 7 Facts about Bach’s Sonatas & Partitas That Will Amaze You

    On September 19, Christian Tetzlaff opens the 92Y Concerts season with a performance of the complete Bach Sonatas and Partitas—one of the monuments of Western music.

    While the six individual sonatas and partitas are regularly performed, Christian Tetzlaff is one of only a few artists who present the complete cycle as in a single epic program. In the following Q&A with 92Y, he discusses his thoughts and experience with Bach and the cycle.

    So the entire cycle turns on the Chaconne? Yes, it is such a devastating piece of music. It is thirteen minutes long and connected to the other movements in the partita, and yet it towers above everything else. And then after such music—where could one possibly go? Even Bach doesn’t know. In his manuscript, the Chaconne stops and then the next sonata—which is supposed to be in C major—starts directly on the next line in the same register, same rhythm, same tempo, and even by the fifth measure, in the same key—D minor.

    Read the full enlightening Q&A here.

    Previously: 7 Facts about Bach’s Sonatas & Partitas That Will Amaze You