1. Want to do 100 reps? Follow these 3 steps! Performing 100 straight repetitions of any exercise represents a fitness milestone. But admit it—you’ll also get a big ego boost out of the deal, as well as gain a truckload of gym cred.  There’s only one problem: How do you get there? Cliff Turner, a personal trainer at the 92Y May Center for Health, Fitness & Sport, gave us three tips for entering the 100-rep club:
Perform a target exercise, like push ups, for as many reps as possible within a specific timeframe. Ten minutes should be sufficient.
You can take breaks during those 10 minutes, but remember the objective—as many reps as you can.
Dedicate one day to this routine and perform your regular workouts that involve your target exercise throughout the week.
Turner doesn’t want you to feel punked by 100 reps. “You can think of it as 10 reps each minute for 10 minutes,” he says.
Placing your muscles under reasonable stress for one day each week, while allowing for sufficient active and passive recovery time, will increase your stamina. Even if you can’t perform 100 straight repetitions after following this regimen, you’ll likely find that you can knock out more reps than before. Turner is currently using this technique to perform deadlifts. 750 times.

    Want to do 100 reps? Follow these 3 steps!

    Performing 100 straight repetitions of any exercise represents a fitness milestone. But admit it—you’ll also get a big ego boost out of the deal, as well as gain a truckload of gym cred.

    There’s only one problem: How do you get there?

    Cliff Turner, a personal trainer at the 92Y May Center for Health, Fitness & Sport, gave us three tips for entering the 100-rep club:

    1. Perform a target exercise, like push ups, for as many reps as possible within a specific timeframe. Ten minutes should be sufficient.
    2. You can take breaks during those 10 minutes, but remember the objective—as many reps as you can.
    3. Dedicate one day to this routine and perform your regular workouts that involve your target exercise throughout the week.

    Turner doesn’t want you to feel punked by 100 reps. “You can think of it as 10 reps each minute for 10 minutes,” he says.

    Placing your muscles under reasonable stress for one day each week, while allowing for sufficient active and passive recovery time, will increase your stamina. Even if you can’t perform 100 straight repetitions after following this regimen, you’ll likely find that you can knock out more reps than before. Turner is currently using this technique to perform deadlifts. 750 times.

  2. Workout like a superhero! Have you ever seen gym rats who do bench presses and curls all day, but can’t do something as simple as this?  What’s the use of having a superhero’s body if you can’t do super stuff?  92Y May Center personal trainer Cliff Turner wants to help men and women use their muscles for good with his new Superhero Fit series on the May Center’s Facebook page. Catch a new post every Thursday; the first entry’s already live! You feel us, bro?

    Workout like a superhero!

    Have you ever seen gym rats who do bench presses and curls all day, but can’t do something as simple as this?

    What’s the use of having a superhero’s body if you can’t do super stuff?

    92Y May Center personal trainer Cliff Turner wants to help men and women use their muscles for good with his new Superhero Fit series on the May Center’s Facebook page. Catch a new post every Thursday; the first entry’s already live! You feel us, bro?

  3. Take your Yoga practice back to its roots—outdoors.Margarita Manwelyan, a 92Y May Center Yoga instructor, says that Yoga was born out of nature, so think of outdoor Yoga as going back to its roots—which in Margarita’s case means finding a rooftop.

    Take your Yoga practice back to its roots—outdoors.

    Margarita Manwelyan, a 92Y May Center Yoga instructor, says that Yoga was born out of nature, so think of outdoor Yoga as going back to its roots—which in Margarita’s case means finding a rooftop.

  4. Look like an athlete: The ‘200’ Workout “Two hundred or as many reps as possible” [or AMRAP] was 92Y May Center personal trainer Cliff Turner’s response when we asked him how many reverse-grip barbell push presses he intended to do. Of course that made us curious enough to follow Cliff around and take notes on his entire workout, a metabolic resistance training routine that will help him grow muscle and build endurance at the same time:
For 10 minutes: Reverse-Grip Push Presses, – 200 reps or AMRAP
For 10 minutes: Cable Triceps Extensions, – 200 reps or AMRAP
For 10 minutes: Cable Biceps Extensions, – 200 reps or AMRAP
For 20 minutes: Sliding Mountain Climbers, – AMRAP
Yeah, definitely a beast-level workout. Cliff says you should increase the amount of weight used if you can crank out more than 200 reps. Rest 90-120 seconds before starting the next set.
While the clock never stops during the 10-minute exertion intervals, you should feel free to stop and then continue your reps at any point. Cliff strongly suggests that newbies to this routine should cut the time and target reps in half, if not more.  Cliff also recommends that well-conditioned athletes and fitness thrill seekers can replace the exercises with functional movements like deadlifts, burpees, pull-ups and cleans.  Looking for more routines? The May Center’s Facebook page regularly features exercises with varying levels of sanity.

    Look like an athlete: The ‘200’ Workout

    “Two hundred or as many reps as possible” [or AMRAP] was 92Y May Center personal trainer Cliff Turner’s response when we asked him how many reverse-grip barbell push presses he intended to do.

    Of course that made us curious enough to follow Cliff around and take notes on his entire workout, a metabolic resistance training routine that will help him grow muscle and build endurance at the same time:

    • For 10 minutes: Reverse-Grip Push Presses, – 200 reps or AMRAP
    • For 10 minutes: Cable Triceps Extensions, – 200 reps or AMRAP
    • For 10 minutes: Cable Biceps Extensions, – 200 reps or AMRAP
    • For 20 minutes: Sliding Mountain Climbers, – AMRAP

    Yeah, definitely a beast-level workout. Cliff says you should increase the amount of weight used if you can crank out more than 200 reps. Rest 90-120 seconds before starting the next set.

    While the clock never stops during the 10-minute exertion intervals, you should feel free to stop and then continue your reps at any point. Cliff strongly suggests that newbies to this routine should cut the time and target reps in half, if not more.

    Cliff also recommends that well-conditioned athletes and fitness thrill seekers can replace the exercises with functional movements like deadlifts, burpees, pull-ups and cleans.

    Looking for more routines? The May Center’s Facebook page regularly features exercises with varying levels of sanity.

  5. Want to be fit? Let your mind be your boss. Here’s a fitness motivation message from Jake Allyne, a personal trainer at the 92Y May Center for Health, Fitness & Sport.  Speaking of mind over body, this photo was taken during Jake’s workout routine, which included performing five deadlifts with 70 percent of his one-rep max, every minute, on the minute, for 20 minutes straight.  You can find more of our personal trainers’ workouts on the May Center’s Facebook page.

    Want to be fit? Let your mind be your boss.

    Here’s a fitness motivation message from Jake Allyne, a personal trainer at the 92Y May Center for Health, Fitness & Sport.

    Speaking of mind over body, this photo was taken during Jake’s workout routine, which included performing five deadlifts with 70 percent of his one-rep max, every minute, on the minute, for 20 minutes straight.

    You can find more of our personal trainers’ workouts on the May Center’s Facebook page.

  6. Why you need to break up with your sofa—now Still haven’t gotten around to breaking up with your sofa so that you can see more treadmills? What if we told you that sitting around is taking away the best years of your life? The World Health Organization says that physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk for global deaths. Need another compelling reason to move on? Dr. Jordan Metzl, a sports physician at the Hospital for Special Surgery and author of The Exercise Cure, presented a slide during his recent 92Y talk that summarized how researchers found exercise to be just as effective as medicine in treating many life-threatening diseases.  By the way, the 92Y May Center’s Facebook page can help you with that split, and perhaps help you live longer.

    Why you need to break up with your sofa—now

    Still haven’t gotten around to breaking up with your sofa so that you can see more treadmills? What if we told you that sitting around is taking away the best years of your life? The World Health Organization says that physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk for global deaths.

    Need another compelling reason to move on? Dr. Jordan Metzl, a sports physician at the Hospital for Special Surgery and author of The Exercise Cure, presented a slide during his recent 92Y talk that summarized how researchers found exercise to be just as effective as medicine in treating many life-threatening diseases.

    By the way, the 92Y May Center’s Facebook page can help you with that split, and perhaps help you live longer.

  7. May Center personal trainer Jake AllyneDid you fall off the fitness wagon yet? If there’s any truth to the 2007 study by British psychologist Richard Wiseman, which says 88 percent of those who set New Year’s resolutions fail, there’s a chance you’ve already ditched your gym appointment for the sofa by now – and we’re only halfway through January. So how do you become a member of the 12 percent who walks the talk? 92Y May Center personal trainer Jake Allyne says the biggest challenge is to just get through the first two weeks. “A popular saying is, ‘the hardest part about working out is getting to the gym.’ Yet I always see the gym during the first two weeks of January packed with people who ate plenty of food over the holidays, felt guilty afterwards and then made healthy New Year’s resolutions,” Allyne says. “I think the hardest part is not falling off the wagon during the first two weeks.” In other words: make working out a habit. Whether you need more or less time, there’s plenty of science that supports the development of good habits to make personal changes. Allyne’s additional advice: “Getting up and moving on a daily basis helps you to live a healthy lifestyle throughout the year, which means you can eat guilt-free on almost any occasion – including the holidays.” Okay, pick up that gym bag again!

    May Center personal trainer Jake Allyne

    Did you fall off the fitness wagon yet?

    If there’s any truth to the 2007 study by British psychologist Richard Wiseman, which says 88 percent of those who set New Year’s resolutions fail, there’s a chance you’ve already ditched your gym appointment for the sofa by now – and we’re only halfway through January.

    So how do you become a member of the 12 percent who walks the talk?

    92Y May Center personal trainer Jake Allyne says the biggest challenge is to just get through the first two weeks.

    “A popular saying is, ‘the hardest part about working out is getting to the gym.’ Yet I always see the gym during the first two weeks of January packed with people who ate plenty of food over the holidays, felt guilty afterwards and then made healthy New Year’s resolutions,” Allyne says. “I think the hardest part is not falling off the wagon during the first two weeks.”

    In other words: make working out a habit. Whether you need more or less time, there’s plenty of science that supports the development of good habits to make personal changes.

    Allyne’s additional advice: “Getting up and moving on a daily basis helps you to live a healthy lifestyle throughout the year, which means you can eat guilt-free on almost any occasion – including the holidays.”

    Okay, pick up that gym bag again!

  8. A few of the personal trainers at the 92Y May Center for Health, Fitness & Sport appear to have a fascination with showing off their backs this summer.
First Coach Kaylin bared her shoulder blades to promote her May Center Facebook series Get Kaylin’s Back, then Jake Allyne – the Abs by Jake guy – didn’t want to feel left out so he struck a shirtless pose to support Kaylin’s series, and now trainer Julian Singer (above) gave his back to the camera.
You should know that Julian is 57 years old.

    A few of the personal trainers at the 92Y May Center for Health, Fitness & Sport appear to have a fascination with showing off their backs this summer.

    First Coach Kaylin bared her shoulder blades to promote her May Center Facebook series Get Kaylin’s Back, then Jake Allyne – the Abs by Jake guy – didn’t want to feel left out so he struck a shirtless pose to support Kaylin’s series, and now trainer Julian Singer (above) gave his back to the camera.

    You should know that Julian is 57 years old.

  9. SHOULD YOU STRETCH BEFORE YOUR WORKOUT?
Do you want to maximize your workout or game performance? Try a warm-up instead of a stretch.
While many of us hold the idea of pre-workout stretching as a sacred truth, recent studies say stretching before your workout can not only inhibit your performance, but the practice may also be harmful. “Warming up does more to prepare your body for physical activity than stretching can. You want to increase your body’s’ temperature, loosen your muscles and lubricate your joints before the workout,” says Michael Hughes (pictured), a group exercise instructor at the 92Y May Center for Health, Fitness & Sport. “You don’t want to force your cold body into a deep stretch. That’s a good way to invite injury,” adds Hughes.
Rose Tirado, a personal trainer at the 92Y May Center for Health, Fitness & Sport, also endorses warming-up over pre-workout stretching. Tirado says a warm-up can be performed with cardio exercise equipment such as a treadmill or elliptical trainer. “If my clients don’t have access to aerobic equipment, I tell them to perform dynamic stretching – movements that closely resemble the main activity to be performed,” says Tirado.

    SHOULD YOU STRETCH BEFORE YOUR WORKOUT?

    Do you want to maximize your workout or game performance? Try a warm-up instead of a stretch.

    While many of us hold the idea of pre-workout stretching as a sacred truth, recent studies say stretching before your workout can not only inhibit your performance, but the practice may also be harmful. “Warming up does more to prepare your body for physical activity than stretching can. You want to increase your body’s’ temperature, loosen your muscles and lubricate your joints before the workout,” says Michael Hughes (pictured), a group exercise instructor at the 92Y May Center for Health, Fitness & Sport. “You don’t want to force your cold body into a deep stretch. That’s a good way to invite injury,” adds Hughes.

    Rose Tirado, a personal trainer at the 92Y May Center for Health, Fitness & Sport, also endorses warming-up over pre-workout stretching. Tirado says a warm-up can be performed with cardio exercise equipment such as a treadmill or elliptical trainer. “If my clients don’t have access to aerobic equipment, I tell them to perform dynamic stretching – movements that closely resemble the main activity to be performed,” says Tirado.

  10. What’s the one exercise you can’t live without? We tossed that question to 92Y May Center personal trainer Jake Allyne and he demonstrated a movement he calls “Hi Definition.”
Performing one Hi-Definition as shown in the chart above means you’ve completed a squat, a curl, a squat-thrust, 10 mountain climbers, a high lunge on each leg and a push-up while never allowing your two dumbbells to leave your hands. You just might have a legitimate shot at being fit for life if you did three sets of ten Hi-Defs three times a week.
Jake’s got you covered if you can’t perform Hi-Defs right away. A photo album of prerequisite exercises can be found on the May Center’s Facebook page. While you’re there, take a look at the Abs by Jake series and get some ideas for putting higher definition on your six-pack.

    What’s the one exercise you can’t live without? We tossed that question to 92Y May Center personal trainer Jake Allyne and he demonstrated a movement he calls “Hi Definition.”

    Performing one Hi-Definition as shown in the chart above means you’ve completed a squat, a curl, a squat-thrust, 10 mountain climbers, a high lunge on each leg and a push-up while never allowing your two dumbbells to leave your hands. You just might have a legitimate shot at being fit for life if you did three sets of ten Hi-Defs three times a week.

    Jake’s got you covered if you can’t perform Hi-Defs right away. A photo album of prerequisite exercises can be found on the May Center’s Facebook page. While you’re there, take a look at the Abs by Jake series and get some ideas for putting higher definition on your six-pack.