1. Jimi Hendrix - “Born Under A Bad Sign”

    #TuesdayTip - A Blues n’ Roll by Chris Bergson, 92Y School of Music faculty member and guitarist extraordinaire. His albums Fall Changes and Imitate the Sun were named MOJO Magazine’s #1 Blues Album of 2008 and #2 Blues Album of 2011, respectively.

    Ever wanted to learn how to master the “Rollin’ and Tumblin’” technique mastered by blues masters like Albert King and B.B. King, and imitated by rock guitarists like Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Duane Allman, Stevie Ray Vaughn and Derek Trucks? Check out my three steps to “Rollin’ and Tumblin’” greatness, and then head on over to my Blues and Rock guitar workshop this Sunday, March 9, at 92Y’s High School Guitar Day, where Sheryl Bailey and I will also be performing her arrangement of Jimi Hendrix’s “Voodoo Child” in the High School Guitar Day opening concert.

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  2. Performing at the White House is a career highlight for any artist. For guitarist Sharon Isbin, it came November 9, 2009, with President and Mrs. Obama in the audience.
Ms. Isbin performed two works that she’ll also play at her 92Y recital this Saturday night: Albéniz’ iconic Asturias and Barios Mangore’s Waltz in D major, Op. 8, No. 4.
BTW: the piano in the background is the White House 1938 Steinway with gilt American eagle supports, designed with help from Franklin Roosevelt.

    Performing at the White House is a career highlight for any artist. For guitarist Sharon Isbin, it came November 9, 2009, with President and Mrs. Obama in the audience.

    Ms. Isbin performed two works that she’ll also play at her 92Y recital this Saturday night: Albéniz’ iconic Asturias and Barios Mangore’s Waltz in D major, Op. 8, No. 4.

    BTW: the piano in the background is the White House 1938 Steinway with gilt American eagle supports, designed with help from Franklin Roosevelt.

  3. How does an artist create a recital program? On Tue, Dec 3, Chinese guitarist Xuefei Yang will give the second concert in the new 92Y at SubCulture series. She’s written an introduction to her program explaining her selections and her feelings towards the music.
My program takes you on a musical journey from the 1600s through 2013, and across Europe, South America and Asia. Along the way I will showcase three pieces that are considered 20th century masterworks for the instrument and give the world premiere of a piece from my homeland China.
The first half features the music of Benjamin Britten and Schubert. The year 2013 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of the British composer Benjamin Britten. He wrote just one piece for solo guitar, Nocturnal after John Dowland, for the British guitarist Julian Bream. It is based on the theme of sleep, and dreams. It is one of the most important pieces written for the instrument. I love this piece and want to play it for you in this centenary year.
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Britten’s Courtly Dances are from his opera Gloriana, set almost 500 years ago in the Royal Court of Queen Elizabeth I. In this anniversary year, I have transcribed the full set of dances for solo guitar. At first, I thought a couple of the dances were impossible to play, but I finally figured them out. So I hope you will agree with me that they work on the instrument and are a worthy addition to the guitar repertoire.
I always include a Romantic piece in my program, and this time I chose one of my all-time favourite Romantic composers, Franz Schubert whose music speaks to me directly. I have selected six of his songs, and I owe a debt of gratitude to the 19th century guitarist/composer Johann Kasper Mertz for these beautiful arrangements.
I will start the second half with the USA premiere of a piece (commissioned for me by Wigmore Hall in London) from the USA-based Chinese composer Chen Yi. I am very excited about this piece as it is the first I have received from a Chinese composer. It is based a Chinese folk-style called Shuo Chang which typically uses drums, singing and speaking to present a musical drama. This piece presents all these elements as a monodrama on a single guitar. I hope you will enjoy the sounds, colours and textures of this piece.
For the final two pieces of the second half, I chose two of the masterworks from the 20th century guitar repertoire. William Walton was a British composer who wrote these Five Bagatelles for Julian Bream. Although “Bagatelle” means a short, light piece, these are technically challenging to play. The pieces carry some of the warmth of the Italy, where Walton spent many years of his life.
The final piece is by Alberto Ginastera and written for Brazilian guitarist Carlos Barbosa Lima. His Sonata in four movements showcases and deconstructs the sounds, ambiance and rhythms of his native Argentina, ending in a frenzied and exciting finale to close the concert.

    How does an artist create a recital program? On Tue, Dec 3, Chinese guitarist Xuefei Yang will give the second concert in the new 92Y at SubCulture series. She’s written an introduction to her program explaining her selections and her feelings towards the music.

    My program takes you on a musical journey from the 1600s through 2013, and across Europe, South America and Asia. Along the way I will showcase three pieces that are considered 20th century masterworks for the instrument and give the world premiere of a piece from my homeland China.

    The first half features the music of Benjamin Britten and Schubert. The year 2013 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of the British composer Benjamin Britten. He wrote just one piece for solo guitar, Nocturnal after John Dowland, for the British guitarist Julian Bream. It is based on the theme of sleep, and dreams. It is one of the most important pieces written for the instrument. I love this piece and want to play it for you in this centenary year.

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  4. The Segovia Master Class in Spain (1965)

    One way Andrés Segovia furthered his legacy was by giving master classes around the world. Of the seven artists performing in 92Y’s Segovia Tribute concert tomorrow, four—Oscar Ghiglia, Adam Holzman, Richard Savino, Christopher Parkening—were chosen to participate in Segovia master classes. (Eliot Fisk was a pupil but never did a master class.)
     
    Oscar Ghiglia’s 1965 master class with Segovia in Spain was filmed; watch this beautiful footage above.
     
    Fast forward 48 years, and Mr. Ghiglia brings that legacy to 92Y and a new generation this Sunday, Oct 27, by leading his own master class at the 92Y School of Music.

    Previously: Segovia and his Guitars: 92Y Concerts visits the Metropolitan Museum of Art
     

  5. In 1987 Andrés Segovia presented two guitars to the Metropolitan Museum of Art for its Musical Instruments Collection: his 1912 Ramirez and 1937 Hauser. He began his career with the Ramirez, but it was with the Hauser that he defined a “classical guitar” sound and established his instrument as a major force in classical music.

    92Y’s Benjamin Verdery sits down with the curators of the Musical Instruments Collections—J. Kenneth Moore and Jayson Kerr Dobney—in front of the case containing the Segovia Guitars to discuss Segovia, the instruments, and his lasting legacy.

    The conversation was a prelude to 92Y’s “An American Tribute to Segovia,” a concert on Oct 26, 2013, led by Verdery and featuring Eliot Fisk, Oscar Ghiglia, Christopher Parkening and others.

  6. Guitar legend Andrés Segovia played at 92nd Street Y twice, on February 27, 1938 and March 10, 1980. This rare recording, released for the first time today, features the 1980 concert which was scheduled on short notice after an unexpected cancellation by the cellist Mstislav Rostropovich.

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  7. On March 11, 1979, an 86-year-old Andrés Segovia gave a recital in the East Room of the White House. Among the works he performed were Canción Del Emperador and “Guardame las vacas” by the Spanish Renaissance composer Luis de Narváez.

    On October 26 at 92Y, Richard Savino will perform “Guardame las vacas” in 92Y’s “American Tribute to Andrés Segovia” concert.

  8. Concerto for Guitar and Chamber Orchestra by Villa-Lobos dedicated to Andrés Segovia. Guitarist Eliot Fisk will play the cadenza of this concerto as a solo piece on October 26 for our “An American Tribute to Andrés Segovia” concert. 
You can view a photo album of Andrés Segovia’s Manuscripts on our Facebook page. And check out the hashtag #92YSegovia on Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for other interviews, photos, recordings, and more.
(Image courtesy of Yale University Irving S. Gilmore Music Library.) 

    Concerto for Guitar and Chamber Orchestra by Villa-Lobos dedicated to Andrés Segovia. Guitarist Eliot Fisk will play the cadenza of this concerto as a solo piece on October 26 for our “An American Tribute to Andrés Segovia” concert. 

    You can view a photo album of Andrés Segovia’s Manuscripts on our Facebook page. And check out the hashtag #92YSegovia on Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for other interviews, photos, recordings, and more.

    (Image courtesy of Yale University Irving S. Gilmore Music Library.) 

  9. The Metropolitan Museum of Art has created a short film on one of the two “Segovia Guitars” in its Musical Instruments collection, his beloved 1937 Hauser.
On October 26 at 92Y, Benjamin Verdery will lead five guitarists in a tribute concert to Andrés Segovia. He recently talked with the Collection’s two curators about Segovia and his guitars at the Met Collection itself. Stay tuned for the interview’s posting.

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art has created a short film on one of the two “Segovia Guitars” in its Musical Instruments collection, his beloved 1937 Hauser.

    On October 26 at 92Y, Benjamin Verdery will lead five guitarists in a tribute concert to Andrés Segovia. He recently talked with the Collection’s two curators about Segovia and his guitars at the Met Collection itself. Stay tuned for the interview’s posting.

  10. Image courtesy of Yale University’s Irving S. Gilmore Music Library
Following the model of Spanish composer and guitarist Francisco Tárrega (1852-1909), Andrés Segovia was a prolific arranger of encore pieces, ranging widely across periods and styles, from Haydn and Gluck to Scriabin and Debussy.
On October 26 at 92Y, Benjamin Verdery will perform Segovia’s transcriptions of Schumann’s “Mai, lieber Mai” (“May, Sweet May,” or “Mayo, buen mayo”) and Mendelssohn’s “Song Without Words,” Op.119, No.1 (or “Romanza sin palabras”).
Here’s a manuscript of one of these transcriptions in Segovia’s own handwriting.

    Image courtesy of Yale University’s Irving S. Gilmore Music Library

    Following the model of Spanish composer and guitarist Francisco Tárrega (1852-1909), Andrés Segovia was a prolific arranger of encore pieces, ranging widely across periods and styles, from Haydn and Gluck to Scriabin and Debussy.

    On October 26 at 92Y, Benjamin Verdery will perform Segovia’s transcriptions of Schumann’s “Mai, lieber Mai” (“May, Sweet May,” or “Mayo, buen mayo”) and Mendelssohn’s “Song Without Words,” Op.119, No.1 (or “Romanza sin palabras”).

    Here’s a manuscript of one of these transcriptions in Segovia’s own handwriting.