1. Jazz in July’s first group of artists outside 92Y in 1985. Photo by Steve J. Sherman4 Facts You Didn’t Know About the Maestros of Jazz in July
Our six-concert Jazz in July music festival kicks off on July 22, featuring the music of Hoagy Charmichael, Leonard Bernstein, Miles Davis and the songs that kept Fred Astaire dancing. While the concert series readies to debut its 30th season, the New York Times profiled Jazz in July’s original artistic director Dick Hyman (who created it in 1985) and his successor Bill Charlap. Below are four facts you may not have known about these jazz lovers.
Prior to his creation of Jazz in July, Hyman worked with filmmaker Woody Allen and choreographer Twyla Tharp.
Hyman and Charlap are distant cousins.
Charlap’s father, Mark “Moose” Charlap, is the composer of the Broadway musical Peter Pan.
Charlap is an accomplished artist on Blue Note Records.
Learn more about Jazz in July in the Times. Then get your secure your seats and experience the “hot jazz” for yourself!

    Jazz in July’s first group of artists outside 92Y in 1985. Photo by Steve J. Sherman

    4 Facts You Didn’t Know About the Maestros of Jazz in July

    Our six-concert Jazz in July music festival kicks off on July 22, featuring the music of Hoagy Charmichael, Leonard Bernstein, Miles Davis and the songs that kept Fred Astaire dancing. While the concert series readies to debut its 30th season, the New York Times profiled Jazz in July’s original artistic director Dick Hyman (who created it in 1985) and his successor Bill Charlap. Below are four facts you may not have known about these jazz lovers.

    • Prior to his creation of Jazz in July, Hyman worked with filmmaker Woody Allen and choreographer Twyla Tharp.
    • Hyman and Charlap are distant cousins.
    • Charlap’s father, Mark “Moose” Charlap, is the composer of the Broadway musical Peter Pan.
    • Charlap is an accomplished artist on Blue Note Records.

    Learn more about Jazz in July in the Times. Then get your secure your seats and experience the “hot jazz” for yourself!

  2. Inside 92Y gives you the behind-the-scenes scoop on what’s going on at 92nd Street Y. And we give extra meaning to “scoop” this week.

    • 5 things we learned about Blondie’s Debbie Harry and Chris Stein.
    • Ice cream startups Coolhaus and Ample Hills Creamery bring their frozen treats to 92Y.
    • Learn how 92Y brings music education and concert experiences to NYC students.
    • Celebrity gossip blogger Perez Hilton shares the best advice he’s ever received.

  3. Photo: Meaningfulmama.com
#TuesdayTip Using Your Kitchen to Set the Stage for Family Funby Paul Williams, 92Y School of Music InstructorLooking to add some musical fun to your family time, but aren’t sure where to begin? You don’t need fancy instruments or any specialized know-how beyond a basic sense of rhythm. Just look around your kitchen and follow these easy steps:
Gather some pots and pans (plastic containers work, too).
Grab a wooden spoon or plastic utensils.
Bang them together to a beat, and voila! You’ve got the percussion to lead you through a family jam session.
Set everyone up with a pot and spoon and the whole family can join in!
Most importantly, don’t worry about how it sounds! Just have fun and let your children experiment with the different sounds; learning and growing their familiarity with making sound is what it’s all about.
BONUS TIP: Once you’re all jamming, break out the smartphone and capture it all on video. A quick upload to YouTube and you’ve got your family band’s first music video!
For a little more harmony, throw on one of your favorite recordings to play along to, or if someone in the clan does play an instrument, they can jump in on the action too. Sing along, dance and have a music party!
 (The stuffed animals, trucks, trains and dolls can join as well.) 
Want to take your young one’s music skills to the next level? Join Paul for a class this summer!

    Photo: Meaningfulmama.com

    #TuesdayTip Using Your Kitchen to Set the Stage for Family Fun
    by Paul Williams, 92Y School of Music Instructor

    Looking to add some musical fun to your family time, but aren’t sure where to begin? You don’t need fancy instruments or any specialized know-how beyond a basic sense of rhythm. Just look around your kitchen and follow these easy steps:

    • Gather some pots and pans (plastic containers work, too).
    • Grab a wooden spoon or plastic utensils.
    • Bang them together to a beat, and voila! You’ve got the percussion to lead you through a family jam session.
    • Set everyone up with a pot and spoon and the whole family can join in!
    • Most importantly, don’t worry about how it sounds! Just have fun and let your children experiment with the different sounds; learning and growing their familiarity with making sound is what it’s all about.
    • BONUS TIP: Once you’re all jamming, break out the smartphone and capture it all on video. A quick upload to YouTube and you’ve got your family band’s first music video!

    For a little more harmony, throw on one of your favorite recordings to play along to, or if someone in the clan does play an instrument, they can jump in on the action too. Sing along, dance and have a music party!
 (The stuffed animals, trucks, trains and dolls can join as well.)

    Want to take your young one’s music skills to the next level? Join Paul for a class this summer!

  4. Photo from inneri on Flickr: http://bit.ly/1tAiHWU | Cropped, titled and blurred from original | Used under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 | 
#MusicMonday: 8 Songs You Should Never Play at a Wedding June is the month for weddings, and thousands of young couples are discussing what music to choose for their service. Popular songs have long been part of weddings, ever since Fiddler on the Roof’s “Sunrise, Sunset,” Elvis’ “Can’t Help Falling in Love” and the Beatles’ “All You Need Is Love.”  As a public service, we’ve put together a list of songs that should probably never be sung at any wedding:
“50 Ways to Leave Your Lover” by Paul Simon
“Another One Bites The Dust” by Queen
“The Blame Game” by Kanye West
“Cry Me a River” by Justin Timberlake
“I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” by U2
“Love Stinks” by J. Geils Band
“Love Will Tear Us Apart” by Joy Division
“The Thrill is Gone” by B.B. King
What song did you play at your wedding?

    Photo from inneri on Flickr: http://bit.ly/1tAiHWU | Cropped, titled and blurred from original | Used under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 |

    #MusicMonday: 8 Songs You Should Never Play at a Wedding

    June is the month for weddings, and thousands of young couples are discussing what music to choose for their service. Popular songs have long been part of weddings, ever since Fiddler on the Roof’s “Sunrise, Sunset,” Elvis’ “Can’t Help Falling in Love” and the Beatles’ “All You Need Is Love.”

    As a public service, we’ve put together a list of songs that should probably never be sung at any wedding:

    1. “50 Ways to Leave Your Lover” by Paul Simon
    2. “Another One Bites The Dust” by Queen
    3. “The Blame Game” by Kanye West
    4. “Cry Me a River” by Justin Timberlake
    5. I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” by U2
    6. “Love Stinks” by J. Geils Band
    7. “Love Will Tear Us Apart” by Joy Division
    8. “The Thrill is Gone” by B.B. King

    What song did you play at your wedding?

  5. Chris Stein & Debbie Harry5 Things We Learned About Blondie Last Night Punk rock legends Debbie Harry and Chris Stein joined Rolling Stone’s Anthony DeCurtis at 92Y on May 28 to discuss their 40 years as Blondie. The rock duo reflected on what has changed in music since “Heart of Glass” and “One Way Or Another” hit the airwaves and what they’d like to do next. Here are 5 things we learned:
Harry never listens to their classic records.
Stein was greatly influenced by West Side Story. “People in the later generations don’t get what a huge deal West Side Story was,” Stein said. “It was like unto the Beatles. The girls in the theater would be sobbing when Tony was killed at the end. It was a huge cultural event. It brought everything up to this other level.”
Harry took on her strong female persona because she was “tired of women being the underdog in relationships. I wanted revenge!”
Spending sprees on fancy cars and jets? Who needs ‘em! When they became successful, Stein only wanted to spend his money on more instruments.
Blondie wants an ABBA collaboration! Stein and Harry would love Benny Anderson and Björn Olvaeus to produce their next album. Although Harry adds, “Too bad they’re Swedish.”

    Chris Stein & Debbie Harry

    5 Things We Learned About Blondie Last Night

    Punk rock legends Debbie Harry and Chris Stein joined Rolling Stone’s Anthony DeCurtis at 92Y on May 28 to discuss their 40 years as Blondie. The rock duo reflected on what has changed in music since “Heart of Glass” and “One Way Or Another” hit the airwaves and what they’d like to do next. Here are 5 things we learned:

    • Harry never listens to their classic records.
    • Stein was greatly influenced by West Side Story. “People in the later generations don’t get what a huge deal West Side Story was,” Stein said. “It was like unto the Beatles. The girls in the theater would be sobbing when Tony was killed at the end. It was a huge cultural event. It brought everything up to this other level.”
    • Harry took on her strong female persona because she was “tired of women being the underdog in relationships. I wanted revenge!”
    • Spending sprees on fancy cars and jets? Who needs ‘em! When they became successful, Stein only wanted to spend his money on more instruments.
    • Blondie wants an ABBA collaboration! Stein and Harry would love Benny Anderson and Björn Olvaeus to produce their next album. Although Harry adds, “Too bad they’re Swedish.”

  6. Seen on the Lower East Side, soon to be seen on the Upper East Side. One way or another, Blondie’s Debbie Harry and Chris Stein will be on our stage on May 28. With Rolling Stone’s Anthony DeCurtis, the music legends will be discussing their rock ‘n’ roll history, 40 years in the business, and new double CD package Blondie 4(0) Ever. Also, anyone know the artist who created this? We’d love to give them free tickets to the event. Tweet us @92Y if you know!

    Seen on the Lower East Side, soon to be seen on the Upper East Side. One way or another, Blondie’s Debbie Harry and Chris Stein will be on our stage on May 28. With Rolling Stone’s Anthony DeCurtis, the music legends will be discussing their rock ‘n’ roll history, 40 years in the business, and new double CD package Blondie 4(0) Ever. Also, anyone know the artist who created this? We’d love to give them free tickets to the event. Tweet us @92Y if you know!

  7. 
Debbie Harry near the Hollywood sign, 1977

Blondie’s Debbie Harry and Chris Stein are entering 92Y land on May 28 for a conversation with music writer Anthony DeCurtis. Don’t miss!

    Debbie Harry near the Hollywood sign, 1977

    Blondie’s Debbie Harry and Chris Stein are entering 92Y land on May 28 for a conversation with music writer Anthony DeCurtis. Don’t miss!

    (Source: vintagegal)

  8. Loving this quote from Paul Simon on why #ArtMatters. #92YSOA

    Loving this quote from Paul Simon on why #ArtMatters. #92YSOA

  9. What are the most non-boring summer camps ever? Our Passport NYC makes the cut, says Teen Vogue.
Check out all that Passport NYC has to offer. 

    What are the most non-boring summer camps ever? Our Passport NYC makes the cut, says Teen Vogue.

    Check out all that Passport NYC has to offer

  10. #MusicMonday: Is this the sound of genius? Behold the Andalusian Cadence. Never heard of it? Perhaps, but you sure have heard it! It’s a simple sequence of four notes—in the key of A major, it would be A, G, F, E—and it’s been used from the Renaissance to Rihanna, with Beethoven, Mozart, the Beatles, Ray Charles, Michael Jackson, Bob Dylan and Green Day in between. Listen to 50 different examples of Andalusian Cadence from our friends at WNYC Radio. Is that genius? We think so. #thatsgenius

    #MusicMonday: Is this the sound of genius?

    Behold the Andalusian Cadence. Never heard of it? Perhaps, but you sure have heard it! It’s a simple sequence of four notes—in the key of A major, it would be A, G, F, E—and it’s been used from the Renaissance to Rihanna, with Beethoven, Mozart, the Beatles, Ray Charles, Michael Jackson, Bob Dylan and Green Day in between.

    Listen to 50 different examples of Andalusian Cadence from our friends at WNYC Radio.

    Is that genius? We think so. #thatsgenius